Blank Canvas For Sale



Blank Canvas for Sell

This month sees the auction of Turner Prize-winning Bob Law’s ’Nothing To Be Afraid Of V 22.8.69′ work of art, which is expected to reach £60,000. This minimalist work (pictured left) demonstrates ‘… the seductive idea of nothing to a canvas, and asks the viewer to reflect’, according to the officialBonhams catalogue.

Unsurprisingly, not everyone shares such positive opinions. In fact, when I first viewed the work, in a photograph on a page of a newspaper, I was initially impressed that the artist had managed to subtly show a faint image of a man in the work. Then I realised that I was actually viewing an image from the next page of the newspaper through the paper!

More interestingly, does the fact that it is entitled ‘Nothing To Be Afraid Of V’ mean that it is one of a series of five such works?! I would love to see the journey to show how the artist has progressed from his first work to the fifth one seen here. Continue reading


Drugs Banned In India

Here is the latest list of DRUGS BANNED IN INDIA. (15/12/2011)

1. Amidopyrine.

2. Fixed dose combinations of vitamins with anti-inflammatory agents and tranquilizers.

3. Fixed dose combinations of Atropine in Analgesics and Antipyretics.

4. Fixed dose combinations of Strychnine and Caffeine in tonics.

5.Fixed dose combinations of Yohimbine and Strychnine with Testosterone and  Vitamins.

6. Fixed dose combinations of Iron with Strychnine, Arsenic and Yohimbine.

7. Fixed dose combinations of Sodium Bromide/chloral hydrate with other drugs.

8. Phenacetin.

9. Fixed dose combinations of antihistaminic with anti-diarrhoeals.

10. Fixed dose combinations of Penicillin with Sulphonamides.

11. Fixed dose combinations of Vitamins with Analgesics.

12.Fixed dose combinations of  any other Tetracycline with Vitamin C.

13.Fixed dose combinations of Hydroxyquinoline group of drugs with any other drug   except for preparations meant for external use. 

  14. Fixed dose combinations of Corticosteroids with any other drug for internal use.

  15. Fixed dose combinations of Chloramphenicol with any other drug for internal use.

16.Fixed dose combinations of crude Ergot preparations except those containing Ergotamine, Caffeine, analgesics, antihistamines for the treatment of migraine, headaches.

17.Fixed dose combinations of Vitamins with Anti TB drugs except combination of Isoniazid with Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6).

18. Penicillin skin/eye Ointment.

19. Tetracycline Liquid Oral preparations.

20. Nialamide.

21. Practolol.

22. Methapyrilene, its salts.
23. Methaqualone.

24. Oxytetracycline Liquid Oral preparations.

25. Demeclocycline Liquid Oral preparations.

26. Combination of anabolic Steroids with other drugs.

27.Fixed dose combination of Oestrogen and Progestin (other than oral contraceptive) containing per tablet estrogen content of more than 50 mcg (equivalent to Ethinyl Estradiol) and progestin content of more than 3 mg (equivalent to Norethisterone Acetate) and all fixed dose combination injectable preparations containing synthetic Oestrogen and Progesterone. (Subs. By Noti. No. 743 (E) dt 10-08-1989)

  28.Fixed dose combination of Sedatives/ hypnotics/anxiolytics with   analgesics-antipyretics.

  29.Fixed dose combination of Rifampicin, isoniazid and Pyrazinamide, except those which provide daily adult dose given below:

Drugs                             Minimum                 Maximum

Rifampicin                      450 mg                   600 mg

Isoniazid                              300 mg                       400 mg

Pyrazinamide                  1000mg                  1500 mg

30. Fixed dose combination of Histamine H-2 receptor antagonists with antacids except for those combinations approved by Drugs Controller, India.

31.The patent and proprietary medicines of fixed dose combinations of essential oils with alcohol having percentage higher than 20% proof except preparations given in the Indian Pharmacopoeia.

32. All Pharmaceutical preparations containing Chloroform exceeding 0.5% w/w or v/v
whichever is appropriate.

33.Fixed dose combination of Ethambutol with INH other than the following: INH
Ethambutol 200 mg. 600 mg. 300 mg. 800 mg.

34. Fixed dose combination containing more than one antihistamine.

35.Fixed dose combination of any anthelmintic with cathartic/purgative except for
piperazine/Santonim.

36. Fixed dose combination of Salbutamol or any other drug having primarily bronchodilatory activity with centrally acting anti-tussive and/or antihistamine.

37.Fixed dose combination of laxatives and/or anti-spasmodic drugs in enzyme preparations.

38.Fixed dose combination of Metoclopramide with systemically absorbed drugs except fixed dose combination of metoclopramide with aspirin/paracetamol

39.Fixed dose combination of centrally acting, antitussive with antihistamine, having high atropine like activity in expectorants.

40.Preparations claiming to combat cough associated with asthma containing centrally acting antitussive and/ or an antihistamine.

41.Liquid oral tonic preparations containing glycerophosphates and/or other phosphates and / or central nervous system stimulant and such preparations containing alcohol more than 20% proof.

42.Fixed dose combination containing Pectin and/or Kaolin with any drug which is systemically absorbed from GI tract except for combinations of Pectin and/or Kaolin with drugs not systemically absorbed

43. Chloral Hydrate as a drug.

44. Dovers Powder I.P.

45. Dover’s Powder Tablets I.P.

46.Antidiarrhoeal formulations containing Kaolin or Pectin or Attapulgite or Activated Charcoal.

47.Antidiarrhoeal formulations containing Phthalyl Sulphathiazole or Sulphaguanidine or Succinyl Sulphathiazole.

48.Antidiarrhoeal formulations containing Neomycin or Streptomycin or Dihydrostreptomycin  including their respective salts or esters.

49.Liquid Oral antidiarrhoeals or any other dosage form for pediatric use containing Diphenoxylate Lorloperamide or Atropine or Belladona including their salts or esters or metabolites Hyoscyamine or their extracts or their alkaloids.

  50.Liquid Oral antidiarrhoeals or any other dosage form for pediatric use containing halogenated hydroxyquinolines.

51. Fixed dose combination of antidiarrhoeals with electrolytes.

52. Patent and Proprietary Oral Rehydration Salts other than those conforming to the

53. Fixed dose combination of Oxyphenbutazone or Phenylbutazone with any other drug.

54. Fixed dose combination of Analgin with any other drug.

55. Fixed dose combination of dextropropoxyphene with any other drug other than anti-spasmodics and/or non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).

56. Fixed dose combination of a drug, standards of which are prescribed in the Second Schedule to the said Act with an Ayurvedic, Siddha or Unani drug.

57. Mepacrine Hydrochloride (Quinacrine and its salts) in any dosage form for use for female sterilization or contraception.

   58. Fenfluramine and Dexfenfluramine.

59. Fixed dose combination of Diazepam and Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride .

 60. Rimonabant.

 61 Rosiglitazone

    62 Nimesulide formulations for human use in children below 12 years of age.

 63. Cisapride and its formulations for human use.

 64. Phenylpropanolamine and its formulation for human use.

 65. Human Placental Extract and its formulations for human use.

 66. Sibutramine and its formulations for human use, and

 67. R-Sibutramine and its formulations for human use.

    68. Gatifloxacin formulation for systemic use in human by any route including oral and injectable

 69. Tegaserod and its formulation for human use.

Now ‘Timeline’ on your Facebook Profile!!… Biggest Redesign Ever


Facebook Profile!

Timeline on Facebook Profile

 

After an extended wait, the much ballyhooed, much reviled Facebook Timeline is finally here, an official blog post Thursday announced to the world.

While the update has been available in some areas — such as New Zealand last week — for testing and developing purposes, beginning today, the new feature will be available to everyone everywhere.

Users looking to check out the service immediately can go to the Introducing Timeline page and click “Get It Now” button near the bottom right. Otherwise, an announcement will eventually appear at the top of your profile, according to Facebook.

The world’s most prominent social network hopes its latest digital makeover — which aggregates and organizes your profile chronologically — will help you “rediscover the things you shared, and collect your most important moments.

“It’s the heart of your Facebook experience, completely rethought from the ground up,” Zuckerberg gushed when he first introduced the feature druing this year’s f8 conference. “Timeline is the story of your life.”

For those worried about what exactly from their past might be popping up with the new profile, Facebook is giving users up to seven days to review their new Timeline before it becomes public.

Rather to read more, try TIMELINE on your Facebook Profile!!!!

‘Sight inside Brain’ of Relationship Breakup! (Neuroscience of Broken Love)


love, rejection

....Loves me.. hates me...

An unexpected and unwanted breakup can cause considerable psychological distress. People report feeling as if they have been kicked in the stomach or blindsided and knocked down. Feelings of rejection and self-doubt are common, as is the feeling of being stuck and unable to let go, even when one wants to. Friends and family may push the person to get over it and move on, yet brain research suggests this can be very difficult to do, at least in the first few months.

Breakups and the Brain

The research on relationship breakups in unmarried people (generally college students) gives us some clues as to why these events are so subjectively painful. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans show activity in several specific brain areas when rejected individuals see pictures of their ex-partners. Researcher Edward Smith, a cognitive neuroscientist at Columbia University and his colleagues put out fliers in Manhattan and ads on social networking sites to recruit participants who had experienced an unwanted breakup in the last six months. Using fMRI scans, the researchers assessed which brain areas lit up when participants looked at pictures of their ex-partners and simultaneously thought about experiences they had shared together. They compared this to when participants looked at pictures of a friend and were exposed to pain via a hot probe on the arm. The scientists found that the same parts of the brain lit up when individuals looked at the partner pictures or experienced physical pain, but not when they looked at the friend pictures. These brain regions, including the insular and anterior cingulate cortex are known to be associated with pain experience.

fmri scan of brain of a rejected person

fMRI of the brain during a breakup

Our brains appear to process relationship breakups similarly to physical pain. There may be an evolutionary reason for this. The function of pain is to alert the person to physical danger or harm so she can take protective action. In the animal kingdom, one’s chances of avoiding predators are much higher as part of a group than alone, therefore social rejection may have been an actual threat to physical survival for our early ancestors. If this is the case, it might partially explain how difficult it is for many people to let go of the ex-partner and move on.

Obsessive Thoughts & “Cravings”

People who have recently been rejected by their partners often develop obsessive thinking. They may ruminate persistently about the ex-partner, how they are feeling, whether they are missing the relationship, and so on. These thoughts or feelings of loss may be triggered by places they used to go to together, people they used to Continue reading

Google Plus – A Review after first evening of Fun with Features of Google Plus!


I thought I’d type up some notes after an evening of using Google’s new social network, Google Plus. This is a really big deal, a super ambitious effort involving scores of engineers over months of near total secrecy. The service is really, really well done. Will it be good enough? I have no idea, but I have felt drawn to keep using it all night long.

The fundamental value proposition is around privacy: it’s the opposite of Facebook and Twitter’s universal broadcast paradigm. Google Plus is based on the Google Circles feature, which lets you share and view content to and from explicitly identified groups of your contacts, and no one else. It’s really easy to use and a great feature – but even if you’re communicating out in public, the rest of the service is very well designed, too. This is a smart, attractive, very strong social offering from Google. Below are some notes after a few hours of use.


Google Circles to Challenge Facebook Connect

When asked about a Google Plus API, Google’s Joseph Smarr said the following tonight on the site itself. “Of course, and we’re eager to make the social graph a ‘two-way street’ where you can use your circles to quickly get up-and-running on a new site, but also make new friends on that site and add them to your circles. Lots of details to work through, but the best way to do it is with good agile partners building cool social experiences. ;)”That sounds exactly like Facebook Connect, in particular the get up-and-running quickly on a new site part, and makes sense given the degree to which Plus is understood as a challenge to Facebook generally.

GOOGLE PLUS FEATURING AND FUN!

Big picture take-away: Google has built an attractive, intuitive, intelligent service that’s fun to use and speaks to a deep human need for contextual integrity of communication. There is not just public/private, life is more complex than that. This need, unmet by almost any other social network today, is where Google is aiming to win the hearts of users. The app the company built towards that aim is smooth and pleasing to use.

    • The list, group or Circle creation interface is interesting and really easy to use. You drag peoples’ contact cards into big circles at the bottom of the page and those people are added to that group, or Circle. It’s full of fun little animations (try deleting a circle or grabbing multiple contacts) and if there is anything that will make people want to manually organize their contacts, this could be it. This is really important because as I’ve argued for several years, groups are the secret weapon of the social web. Anything that can increase the percentage of social software users who are actively curating dynamic, topical sources is a net win for the web and for the people who use it. List creation on competing services has been a mixed bag. It’s undervalued at Twitter and suffocated on Facebook.
    • When hovering over a username, you can see a set of Circle titles that can be checked off to add people to groups as well. It is a shame that there aren’t any recommendations for people that ought to be grouped together automatically into a common Circle. Google could do that, but perhaps like Face Recognition they worried it would set people aBuzz with eerie privacy concerns.
    • The ability to toss a contact into a Circle with typing and autocomplete make it even easier to organize contacts.
    • Photo sharing is really smooth and easy. The desktop drag and drop uploader is very, very nice. The ability to drag things right into the share box at the top of the newsfeed is nice, too.
    • Photo viewing is a little less elegant, but it’s ok.

Above: XKCD tells it like it is.

    • The mobile web app is very good, though because of an error right now you can’t moderate comments as promised. That’s how high the expectations are set though!
    • The mobile web app makes it easy to check in to locations, though in typical Google style (Plus being a radical departure!) there’s not a lot that happens when you check in.
    • Google Plus One buttons off-site don’t flow into Plus one but they probably will in time.
    • Circles aren’t public and at launch can’t be. The company says it was concerned about making public/private as clear as possible, but the curation of interesting topical Circles and then subscription to other peoples’ Circles has huge potential. Much like Twitter Lists.
  • The Notification and Comments thread drop-down interface that now sits on top of Plus and every other Google web app, from Search to Gmail to Docs, is really nice. It’s ever-present and fully functional. It’s a great way to stay engaged with the service and was a very important addition.
  • The Sparks feature, like a topic-based feed reader for keyword search results, is the least developed part of the site so far. Google Reader is so good, this can’t possibly stay so bad for too long. It’s not bad, the user experience is pretty good, but the content is sparse and there doesn’t seem to be as much quality control as there ought to be in what gets displayed. Too few, mediocre news updates on a topic aren’t exciting, but Sparks does make those updates easy to share and discuss.

The end result? So far and on balance, a very compelling experience. Google Plus invites will roll out to users over time, the first stage is being called a Field Test, in which feedback will be collected before expanding participation.

Have you had a chance to use Plus yet? What do you think of it? Can you imagine hundreds of millions of people leaving Facebook for this and sticking with it? That’s a very tall order.

Missing Links in India’s “Fast-Track” Approach! – ‘Skies and Sea’ of Fight against Corruption


Much has been written and discussed about the recent ‘civil society’ protests against corruption in India. Social activist Anna Hazare’s four day fast in April compelled the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) to re-consider the Lokpal Bill through a joint committee involving ministers and members of civil society. Yoga guru, christened as ‘Baba’ Ramdev, launched his hunger strike in protest against the black money stashed in foreign banks earlier this month. There has been some debate among the supporters of Anna Hazare and Ramdev regarding entrepreneurial recognition for the “fast-track” approach to combat corruption. The Government claims to have been responsive to the demands of civil society in both instances, though Ramdev’s uncompromising attitude necessitated use of force to disband his yoga-cum-protest camp.

Responses to this wave of civil society protests can be broadly classified into two categories. Supporters of the protests justify civil society’s unease on the basis of Government’s growing incompetence, excessive corruption and power induced arrogance. Critics, see the over-zealous members of civil society as a threat to the democratic law making process and institutional separation of powers. Both sides make valid arguments. Is it possible to accurately identify the villain and hero in this confrontation?

Perhaps not. Each side is blaming its imperfections on the other and waging a holier-than-thou campaign. Beyond Continue reading

FDA Examines Ways to Improve Consumer Understanding of Prescription Drug Ads


Findings from three studies conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirm that the way information is conveyed and displayed in printed drug advertising affects consumer understanding of prescription medications.

FDA DRUG IMAGE

FDA EXAMINES WAYS TO IMPROVE CONSUMER UNDERTAKING OF PRESCRIPTION DRUG ADS

The studies, designed by experts in FDA’s Division of Drug, Marketing, Advertising and Communications (DDMAC) in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, examined ways to improve understanding of how consumers use the “brief summary” section of printed prescription drug ads.
The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act specifies that print advertisements for prescription drugs and biological products are required to provide a true statement of information “in brief summary” about the advertised product’s “side effects, contraindications, and effectiveness.”  The online edition of the journal “Medical Decision Making” published findings from the third study today.

“Some of the current approaches to fulfilling the brief summary requirement, while adequate from a regulatory perspective, are not optimal in communicating this important information to consumers,” said Thomas Abrams, director of DDMAC. “FDA’s research and policy development seeks to improve the presentation of this information so it is easier for consumers to read and understand.”

Print ads for prescription drugs are often two (or more) pages long. The first page of the prescription drug ad may feature a picture, information about what the product is intended to be used for, and important information about the product’s risks. The second page summarizes allthe product’s risks and may be presented as densely-packed text information.

In the first study, a serious risk was added to the first and second page of the ad.  In the second study, additional information about side effects was included on the second page.  The third study tested four different brief summary formats:

Traditional (block text paragraphs), Question and Answer (with headings framed in the form of questions), Highlights (based on the highlights section of the physician labeling), and Prescription Drug Facts Box (resembling the current Over the Counter Drug Facts label).

Key findings of the studies include:

  • Adding a serious risk did not hinder people’s understanding of the risk information.
  • Including additional information about how often side effects occur and how long they may last did not hinder people’s understanding of the risk information.
  • Participants who viewed the Drug Facts format were better able to recall risks than those who saw the traditional format.

FDA researchers Kathryn Aikin, Ph.D., Amie O’Donoghue, Ph.D., and Helen Sullivan, Ph.D., M.P.H., and Jack Swasy, Ph.D., from American University designed and led the three experimental studies.

A copy of “Randomized Trial of Risk Information Formats for Brief Summary in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Print Advertisements for Prescription Drugs” will be available in the September/October 2011 issue of “Medical Decision Making.

For more information:

Randomized Trial of Risk Information Formats for Brief Summary in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Print Advertisements for Prescription Drugs

Background on Prescription Drug Advertising

Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising and Communication (DDMAC) Research

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

An Interview with HOSPITAL PHARMACIST! Read it to know “Pharmacy” Better!


While passing by I met a girl with I card and white apron, I thought She must be some medical or paramedical professional and I asked my stamp mark que to her  and than I asked few more things… Few interesting parts are mentioned here… Just see, what a Hospital pharmacist says..!!

 

What do you do for a living? I’m a pharmacist. Hospital Pharmacist.

How would you describe what you do?iStock_000001141719XSmall.jpg

I do order entry of physician orders for the medications that they want to administer in the hospital. There’s the patient chart where the doctor will document and write everything that’s going on with the patient and all the medications and tests and procedures that he wants done. When a medication is written it is faxed to the pharmacy where a pharmacist will review the patient’s allergies, other medications that they’re taking, and appropriateness of the dose. We then enter that into a computer system which goes through a pharmacy database and a robot which is linked to that database will fill those prescriptions as well as technicians that work within the pharmacy will manually fill those prescriptions and then distribute them to the right patients.

 

There’s a lot of difference between a Walgreen’s and a hospital pharmacy, and I would work in both before I’d ever think about being a pharmacist.

What does your work entail?

The position which I have is a Float Pharmacist which means that in our hospital, each unit of the hospital, whether it be an intensive care unit or the orthopedic floor or the stroke unit, each floor has a specific pharmacist that covers that area and works with those patients, doctors, and nurses on a regular basis. When one of those pharmacists either has the day off or is sick or for whatever reason, the Float Pharmacist will cover those areas. So, on any given day, I can be working with any floor of the hospital. For instance, this week I’m going to be covering the neuro-trauma ICU and the surgical ICU areas. That specific position calls me to come in at seven in the morning and I’ll leave at 3:30 in the afternoon. I’ll come in, I’ll go down to the ICU, and I’ll go through those reports while entering any orders that come from the physicians. I will answer questions from the nurses. I’ll answer questions from the physicians. Some of the questions might be specifically related to the drugs and maybe what’s prescribed or side effects, dosing questions, others that are usually given by nurses can be anything from, Why isn’t my medication here? to Can I get a refill on this?. Certain medications have certain things that we have to monitor with their use. There are some medications that we have to monitor specifically. Drugs that are commonly prescribed together can interact with each other so there’s reports that have to be reviewed. There’s a policy within the hospital that the physician can write a prescription for a medications and the pharmacy is to dose. Which means that the pharmacist is responsible for looking at the patient’s kidney function, blood levels for that specific medication, and can change the doses of the medication based on what our opinion is of how they’re metabolizing that drug. So, there are certain reports that we have to go through every day.

I think it’s a really common misconception that a pharmacist is told what to do by the physician and they just do it.

How did you get started?

I thought that I wanted to do something in health care after I was in college for a couple of years and decided to shadow. I ended up shadowing some nurses, a physical therapist, and occupational therapist and then eventually a pharmacist. I liked what I saw when I shadowed the pharmacist. And the one that I ended up shadowing was the director for a hospital pharmacy in the town that I was going to school at. She offered me a job as a technician and then I ended up working in the pharmacy.

What do you like about what you do?

I like that I get to be a member of the health care team and involved with health care in general, but I’m not the type of person that would want to have to deal with the blood and the guts and the gore and the actually physically taking care of the patient. I had considered being a physician but I liked that a pharmacist could work 7:00 to 3:30, probably 95 percent of the time. I’m not on call. I don’t get called after work. I have a set salary which is pretty good. If I wanted to go part-time, it’s very easy for a pharmacist to go part-time. You can work two 10-hour days and make the same amount of money that a lot of other professions make full-time. I can leave the profession if I had a child and wanted to step out for five years. It would be very easy for me to leave my job and then have no trouble at finding another job when I wanted to go back to it, even though I’ve been gone for five years.

What do you dislike?

Let’s see, I dislike that a lot of the time I’m in front of the computer. I dislike that a lot of it is kind of repetitive tasks, and that depends on what type of pharmacist you are, too. There are pharmacists that are much more clinical and aren’t doing those repetitive tasks but the position that I am, I do do a lot of that. I dislike that. It depends where you are and who you happen to be working with, but there are some health care professionals that don’t appreciate what a pharmacist can bring to the table. There are those that really do appreciate and acknowledge the knowledge that we have and how we can help them. It kind of depends on where you’re working.

How do you make money/or how are you compensated?

I make $46.50 an hour. I get paid hourly, but I don’t clock in. So, I’ll get paid for a 40-hour week if I happen to be working my regular shifts. If I need to stay an hour late to finish something then I don’t get paid overtime for that. But if we are short a pharmacists one evening and they need someone to work five hours of overtime, in other words, they ask you to stay late, then I would get paid overtime. But if I’m just finishing something up, then I don’t get paid overtime.

If I wanted to go part-time, it’s very easy for a pharmacist to go part-time. You can work two 10-hour days and make the same amount of money that a lot of other professions make full-time.

How much money do you make?

About $97,000.

What education or skills are needed to do this?

To become a pharmacist, it’s a minimum of six years of education. Where I went, you had to have a year of prerequisites which were kind of normal prerequisites of Math, English, all of those things. And then it was a five-year pharmacy program. A lot of people have their four-year Bachelor’s and then decide to go to pharmacy and it’s still five years after that, regardless of if you have a degree or not, you have to spend five years in pharmacy school. That gives you a doctor of pharmacy’s degree.

What is most challenging about what you do?

Probably staying current on everything, on all of the changes and all of the new drugs, and all of the changes in the care of treating a certain disease. There’s guidelines that change all the time, so staying current on everything is probably the most challenging.

What is most rewarding?

Probably that I can be a part of the health care team and help patients while still being able to have the best of both worlds. Having the best of home life and the best of career life. Your schedule, your pay, and the fact that you’re not on call like a physician makes it a lot easier with what’s going on at home. There’s really not a lot of projects to bring home, work doesn’t usually come home with you. Once you leave work, you’re done.

What advice would you offer someone considering this career?

I went to school with people that had never worked in a pharmacy and just didn’t really know what the pharmacy atmosphere was like. Some people love it and some people would never want to do it. It’s really just a personality thing. So, I would work as a technician in a pharmacy, either retail or hospital. There’s a lot of difference between a Walgreen’s and a hospital pharmacy, and I would work in both before I’d ever think about being a pharmacist.

How much time off do you get/take?

It’s weird because the hospital has this earned time off system which means that my holiday time, my vacation time and all of my sick time is in one big bank. So, if I don’t get sick during the year and I don’t have to call in sick, I’ll get more days that I can take for vacation time. But I’d say at least two weeks, maybe three. Once you hit five years, you start earning more time off.

What is a common misconception people have about what you do?

That all it is is counting pills and entering in a prescription. That’s all a lot of people think a pharmacist does.

What are your goals/dreams for the future?

My goal is to specialize in one area, like all the different floors and units I talked about earlier. My goal is to find an area that I love and to specialize in that and then become a decentralized pharmacist. A decentralized pharmacist just means they’re out of that central area, where all the drugs are stored and dispensing occurs, and they’ll work on the floor with the doctors and nurses directly.

What else would you like people to know about what you do?

Just that there’s a lot of things behind-the-scenes things that goes on in a pharmacist’s head, things that we’re thinking about, things that we’re looking out for when we’re looking at a patient and their prescriptions.  I think it’s a really common misconception that a pharmacist is just told what to do by the physician and they just do it. There’s a lot of evaluating whether or not it’s appropriate and then helping the patient monitor their side effects and make sure that they’re educated in all the things that they need to be aware of so that if this medication has a bad side effect or causes something that’s not supposed to happen, they can tell their physician and get it corrected.

(THIS INTERVIEW WAS TAKEN BY MY DEAR FRIEND JAY PATEL. A SPECIAL THANKS TO JAY PATEL FOR PROVIDING THIS INTERVIEW DETAILS.)