A thought to ‘get planned’! :)


Let me say first, I am not kinda ‘well-planned’ person! But, I am been inspired to become planned from my radio co-host Ali! As learnt – preparation is key. I know lots of people shy away from planners or weekly diaries and many have taken … Continue reading

Red Paperclip to House – Kyle did it!

One Red Paperclip to house

WHEN Kyle MacDonald cut the red ribbon to his new house in Kipling, Canada, in July 2006, it brought back memories of the simple piece of stationary that made it all possible. One year and 14 trades earlier, Kyle was … Continue reading

“God Particle” : A Half Century Invention!


Picture of God Particle

The God Particle : A half century Invention!

A half-century scientific quest culminated early yesterday as physicists announced the discovery of a new subatomic particle — one theorized to be so fundamental that without it, nothing could exist.

Dubbed the Higgs boson — or the “God particle,” to the chagrin of scientists — the particle is thought to create a sort of force field that permeates the universe, imbuing everything that we can see and touch with the fundamental property known as mass.

“As a layman I now say, I think we have it,” said Rolf-Dieter Heuer, director general of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, immediately after physicists presented compelling evidence for the new particle at a seminar in Geneva.

“Do you agree?” he asked the several hundred scientists packing CERN’s main auditorium.

Applause broke out. The video feed from CERN showed Peter Higgs, the University of Edinburgh physicist who theorized the existence of this exotic particle in 1964, tearing up.

“We have a discovery,” said Heuer. “We have discovered a new particle consistent with the Higgs boson. It’s a historic milestone today.”

The scientists at CERN then stood, applauded and cheered for a full minute.

“I have the impression you are all happy,” said Heuer.

Moments later, Higgs, 83, stood and said, “For me, it’s really an incredible thing that happened in my lifetime.”

While there were typical scientist-esque notes of caution — a CERN statement called the discovery “preliminary” — scientists around the world celebrated the moment.

A video feed from Melbourne, Australia, where an international physics conference is set to begin, showed an auditorium packed with cheering scientists.

“One of the most exciting weeks of my life,” said Joe Lykken, a theoretical physicist who worked on one of the two CERN experiments that found evidence of the new particle.

At Fermilab, longtime home of the U.S. high-energy physics community, some 300 people stuffed into two rooms to watch a video feed from Geneva, said Don Lincoln, a Fermilab physicist who contributed to the CERN experiments.

“It’s incredible,” Lincoln said. “People were riveted. Discovery is what scientists live for.”

The announcement was one many Ohio State University physicists had long pursued.

“I’ve been working for 19 years looking forward to this day,” said Stan Durkin, an OSU experimental high-energy physicist. “I can’t express how excited I am.”

The search for the Higgs boson particle stretches back decades and finally settled at the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva after efforts to build a super collider in the United States fell apart. Ohio was among 25 states that bid on the project, but was quickly removed from a list of 25 competing states in 1987.

Texas was ultimately selected, but Congress put a halt to construction in 1993 after projected construction costs soared past $12 billion.

Durkin helped design and build super-sensitive detectors that the Hadron needs to track high-speed particles, called muons, created by the Hadron Collider’s subatomic collisions.

“All of the tracks in the pictures you were shown were read out by Ohio State electronics,” Durkin said.

Christopher Hill, an OSU physicist and one of the leaders of the Hadron Collider’s Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, said the announcement follows observations made back in December that hinted at the Higgs.

Hill said more research was needed to help confirm that a new particle had been discovered.

“We used the same exact analysis techniques, but used twice as much data,” Hill said.

Hill and Richard Hughes, another OSU physicist, said years of research must follow to help reassure scientists that what they’ve found is the Higgs and not something unexpected.

“The next step is to say we need to study this thing to see if it behaves the way we would expect it to,” Hughes said. “Is it consistent with everything we expect from the Higgs boson?”

With a self-imposed deadline of July 4 — set two years ago to align with the conference in Melbourne — CERN physicists raced in recent days to collect and analyze enough data to say they had, indeed, found a new particle that looked like the long-sought Higgs.

As late as Tuesday, two teams pored over results from the last run of high-energy subatomic collisions at the collider, which straddles the French-Swiss border.

“It’s the last month of running that did it,” said Joe Incandela, spokesman for one of the two experiments at CERN that found evidence of the Higgs, during his presentation yesteday morning.

The discovery of the particle completes what’s known as the Standard Model of particle physics, the equivalent of chemistry’s Periodic Table. The Standard Model lists and arranges the particles and forces of nature. Many of the particles were predicted long before they were found — and the Higgs was the last holdout, and the most important.

That’s because it is thought to give rise to the “Higgs field,” a sort of force field that permeates everything.

When the other particles that make up the stuff of the universe — protons, neutrons, electrons and so on — interact with the Higgs field, they acquire the trait known as mass. More-massive objects get tangled up in the field — and hence, slowed down as they move — more than less-massive objects.

The CERN physicists did not see this new particle directly because it disintegrates too quickly. Rather, they divined its existence from sifting through the debris of millions of high-energy subatomic collisions and then searching for clues that the Higgs had been there.

While the Higgs boson research hasn’t produce any direct benefits, the massive scientific effort that led up to the discovery has paid off in other ways, including the creation of the World Wide Web. CERN scientists developed it to make it easier to exchange information among each other.

The vast computing power needed to crunch all of the data produced by the atom smasher has also boosted the development of distributed — or cloud — computing, which is now making its way into mainstream services.

Advances in solar-energy capture, medical imaging and proton therapy — used in the fight against cancer — also have resulted from the work of particle physicists at CERN and elsewhere.

Information from Dispatch reporter Spencer Hunt and the Associated Press were included in this story. 

21 Tactics to Increase Blog Traffic


It’s easy to build a blog, but hard to build a successful blog with significant traffic. Over the years, we’ve grown the Moz blog to nearly a million visits each month and helped lots of other blogs, too. I launched … Continue reading

Mouse-Trap!! Mice revels How Chronic Stress Can Lead to Depression…


Can chronic stress cause depression? A new study in mice adds important evidence that it can, and sheds light on how antidepressants work. The new research, published in Nature, builds on earlier studies showing that chronic high stress kills neurons and prevents … Continue reading

Top 5 stress busting workouts – Kill your Stress Now


Ways to exercise away your angst Life can be (or rather is) very stressful at times. People employ all sorts of methods to combat the rigours of modern living but a guaranteed stress reliever is something available to us all … Continue reading

Let My ‘Mice’ Answer… Does alternative required for animal testings?

Mice

  Not a week goes by without news of a lab breakthrough using rats or mice. But of all the promising medical interventions that make it to animal trials, only a fraction seem to translate into major breakthroughs for humans. … Continue reading

A Facebook Friend Request from your boss. Would you Accept it??


Hmm…Well, the easy answer to this would be ‘No’.  However, it also depends on the type of person that you are as well as the kind of Facebook account you are maintaining.  According to Michelle Nichols of Reuters, a survey of 1,000 … Continue reading

‘Sight inside Brain’ of Relationship Breakup! (Neuroscience of Broken Love)


love, rejection

....Loves me.. hates me...

An unexpected and unwanted breakup can cause considerable psychological distress. People report feeling as if they have been kicked in the stomach or blindsided and knocked down. Feelings of rejection and self-doubt are common, as is the feeling of being stuck and unable to let go, even when one wants to. Friends and family may push the person to get over it and move on, yet brain research suggests this can be very difficult to do, at least in the first few months.

Breakups and the Brain

The research on relationship breakups in unmarried people (generally college students) gives us some clues as to why these events are so subjectively painful. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans show activity in several specific brain areas when rejected individuals see pictures of their ex-partners. Researcher Edward Smith, a cognitive neuroscientist at Columbia University and his colleagues put out fliers in Manhattan and ads on social networking sites to recruit participants who had experienced an unwanted breakup in the last six months. Using fMRI scans, the researchers assessed which brain areas lit up when participants looked at pictures of their ex-partners and simultaneously thought about experiences they had shared together. They compared this to when participants looked at pictures of a friend and were exposed to pain via a hot probe on the arm. The scientists found that the same parts of the brain lit up when individuals looked at the partner pictures or experienced physical pain, but not when they looked at the friend pictures. These brain regions, including the insular and anterior cingulate cortex are known to be associated with pain experience.

fmri scan of brain of a rejected person

fMRI of the brain during a breakup

Our brains appear to process relationship breakups similarly to physical pain. There may be an evolutionary reason for this. The function of pain is to alert the person to physical danger or harm so she can take protective action. In the animal kingdom, one’s chances of avoiding predators are much higher as part of a group than alone, therefore social rejection may have been an actual threat to physical survival for our early ancestors. If this is the case, it might partially explain how difficult it is for many people to let go of the ex-partner and move on.

Obsessive Thoughts & “Cravings”

People who have recently been rejected by their partners often develop obsessive thinking. They may ruminate persistently about the ex-partner, how they are feeling, whether they are missing the relationship, and so on. These thoughts or feelings of loss may be triggered by places they used to go to together, people they used to Continue reading